Life Basics

Love Hurts

Love…..a much overused word. And the definition! Wow! All over the spectrum, from good to bad, positive to negative.

If you’re older than a new teenager you have at least heard the song “Love Hurts” by Nazareth. We listen to those lyrics with mixed emotion, because although we don’t really agree – at the same time, we do. ilovechildren

Love Does Hurt

Love is the thing that gives us the most gratification in life, and therefore opens us up to the most pain.

And our children are what we love the most. Over the years of being a parent and now a grandparent I have made this statement many, many times: Raising children is the most difficult, and the most rewarding thing you will ever do in life.

Love….According to C. S. Lewis   

Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket, safe, dark, motionless, airless, it will change. It will not be broken, it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. To love is to be vulnerable. - from The Four Loves

 Love and Hurt

I have found the paradox, that if you love until it hurts, there can be no more hurt, only more love. - Mother Teresa 

Read more love quotes here.

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Wikio
  • Ask
  • Squidoo
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print

attitude – Attitude – ATTITUDE!

Attitude in our young people – where does it come from? So often we teach our children attitude without having the intention to do so. They watch us and emulate the attitude we live in our own life. Smiles are contagious. “A smile is something you can’t give away; it always comes back to you.”  ~Author Unknown

smile_quotes_graphics_03

Attitude Is 100% Learned

Your little one was not born with a good attitude or a bad one. Like prejudice, everything about the way we approach life comes to us from those we are around each and every day.

The question becomes not “are you teaching your child an attitude toward life” but rather “what attitude are they learning from you?”

 

Do bad things happen in life? To everyone? So, then what difference does attitude make if it can’t help you avoid troubles?

It’s simple really. We have the choice of spreading joy & light if life or carrying the rain clouds of poor attitude with us where ever we go. If life is going to kick you, no matter what you do – and you know it, you still have the same options. You can make people happy to see you or make them happy to see you leave.

Attitude Gives You Wings

Just imagine a child starting out with strong positive affirmations so much a part of daily life that they become the song of joy! But you don’t have to imagine it, just watch Jessica for 50 seconds.

 

 

Even more amazing is the things not quite apparent on first view. About half way through you begin to hear a happy baby off camera. As little Jessica is ‘ramping up’ her affirmation the baby is getting excited too and starting to participate! Additionally, there is so much power and detail in her attitude and words that it is obvious that she has watched and listened to someone else do this – she has learned by example. As I said “Attitude Gives You Wings” that is, positive attitude. But what about the other side of the coin?

Poor Attitude Gives You Tears And Claws

Moving through the trials and tribulations of everyday living wears on you. Having a strong self image and positive attitude smooths out the bumps. But those whose family did not give them this gift…..over time they tend to get worn down and ground up in the gears of ‘reality.’ And after too much pain and sorrow many turn mean and begin to bring others down. Misery loves company doesn’t it?

What will you choose for your children? I know, the best – the right way, etc. But do you really think that all the rest of the world choose differently? Not really. You see, we all want to choose right, but the decision is not enough. It’s all about the action. It’s about what we do and say every day, not when we happen to be thinking clearly. 

Think on this: three frogs are all sitting around in the pond and after a while they all decided to jump off their lily pads.

Here is the question I want to ask you: How many of those frogs are still on the lily pads? All of them. You see they decided to jump off – but the decision must be followed by action. Can you really lose weight by deciding to? Nope. And if you want your child to have a great life you can help with that some. But only if you start right now.

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Wikio
  • Ask
  • Squidoo
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print

Show Them Nature: Get Out Of The House!

Popular author Michael Crichton (October 23, 1942 – November 4, 2008) was a lover of nature and the great outdoors. It shows in nearly all of his works: the jungle – Congo; the ocean – Sphere; the world of bacteria/viruses – Andromeda Strain and later – Prey; the overall planet – State of Fear; and in his last work, published posthumously, the world of plants and insects – Micro.

The Lack of Nature

In recent times he joined those of us in lamenting the lack of real world experience that current generations of children have. There are a number of people who are trying to alert us of the probable challenges arising our of this growing lack. In the Introduction to Micro Mr. Crichton joins the ranks of those calling our attention to the many facets of this problem.

Micro (novel) released Nov 2011

Introduction: What Kind of World Do We Live In?

In 2008 the famous naturalist David Attenboroughn expressed concern that modern school children could not identify common plants and insects found in nature, although previous generations identified them without hesitation. Modern children, it seemed, were cut off from the experience of nature, and from play in the natural world. Many factors were held up to blame: urban living; loss of open space; computers and the internet; heavy homework schedules. But the upshot was that children were no longer being exposed to nature and no longer acquiring a direct experience with nature. It was ironic that this should be happening at a time when there was in the West an ever greater concern for the environment, and ever more ambitious steps proposed to protect it.

Indoctrinating children in proper environmental thought was a hallmark of the green movement, and so children were being instructed to protect something about which they knew nothing at all. It did not escape notice that this was exactly the formula that had led to well-intentioned environmental degradation in the past – the deterioration of American National Parks being a prime example, and the American policy of forest fire prevention, another. Such policies would never have been instituted if people really understood the environments they were trying to protect.

The problem was that they thought they did. One can argue that the new generation of school children will emerge even more certain. If nothing else, school teaches that there is an answer to every question; only in the real world do young people discover that many aspects of life are uncertain, mysterious, and even unknowable. If you have a chance to play in nature, if you are sprayed by a beetle, if the color of a butterfly wing comes off on your fingers, if you watch a caterpillar spin it’s cocoon – you come away with a sense of mystery and uncertainty. The more you watch, the more mysterious the natural world becomes, and the more you realize how little you know. Along with it’s beauty, you may also comes to experience fecundity, it’s wastefulness, aggressiveness, ruthlessness, parasitism, and it’s violence. These qualities are not well-conveyed in textbooks.

Perhaps the single most important lesson to be learned by direct experience is that the natural world, with all it’s elements and interconnections, represents a complex system and therefore we can not understand it and we cannot predict it’s behavior. It is delusion to behave as if we can, as it would be delusion to behave as if we could predict the stock market, another complex system. If someone claims to predict what a stock will do in the coming days, we know that person is either a crook or a charlatan. If an environmentalist makes similar claims about the environment, or an ecosystem, we have not yet learned to see him as a false prophet or a fool.

Human beings interact with complex systems very successfully. We do it all the time. But we do it by managing them, not by claiming to understand them. Managers interact with the system: they do something, watch for the response, and then do something else in an effort to get the result they want. there is an endless iterative interaction that acknowledges we don’t know for sure what the system will do – we have to wait and see. We may be right much of the time. But we are never certain.

Interacting with the natural world, we are denied certainty. And always will be.

How then can young people gain experience of the natural world? Ideally, by spending time in a rain forest – those vast, uncomfortable, alarming, and beautiful environments that so quickly knock our preconceptions aside.

Michael Crichton: August 28, 2008

Saving Our Children From Nature – Deficit Disorder

For a clearer understanding of the depth of the lacking experience and detailed examination of some of the trouble it may cause in people, and therefore our world, you should read Louv’s Last Child In The Woods.

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • Wikio
  • Ask
  • Squidoo
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
© 2014 Raise Your Child Right - Terms | Privacy Policy | Sitemap | Link4 | Link5
Theme design by Business Name
Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor